TestFixtureSetUp and TestFixtureTearDown in Unit Testing using NUnit: Part 4

We have been learning Unit Testing using NUnit together. Read first three parts of this series below,

How to do Unit Test using NUnit : Part 1

Test SetUp and TearDown in Unit Testing using NUnit : Part 2

Ignore Test in Unit Testing using NUnit: Part 3

In Part 2 , we discussed about TestSetUp and TearDown. If notice TestSetUP and TearDown is related to tests. They both get executed each time a test get executed. So if there are 5 tests in Test Fixture then TestSetUp and TearDown will get executed 5 times. Sometime this is good and needed for certain requirements. However doing heavy tasks like cleaning up whole database etc. each time for a test may not be a good idea. You may want to perform certain task for whole test fixture than for each and individual tests.

You can execute certain code before execution of all the tests in test fixture by using attributing that code with [TestFixtureSetUp]. This is used to create setup for all tests at one instant.

So you can create TestFixtureSetup or setup for whole test as following,

clip_image002

Basically we use TestFixtureSetUp to setup for all test. On the other hand you can clean up for all tests once using TestFixtureTearDown.

clip_image004

Using TestFixtureSetUp and TestFixtureTearDown are used to set up test and clean up test. I hope you find this post useful. Thanks for reading.

Ignore Test in Unit Testing using NUnit: Part 3

We have been learning Unit Testing using NUnit together. Read first two part of this series below,

How to do Unit Test using NUnit : Part 1

Test SetUp and TearDown in Unit Testing using NUnit : Part 2

You may come across a scenario when test is itself broken. While executing test you need to ignore certain broken kind of test. Thankfully NUnit provides a very simple solution to ignore a test. By using ignore attribute you can ignore a test.

clip_image002

You can ignore a unit test as following

clip_image004

Let us go back to unit test we wrote in previous part of this series and modify test as following,


[Test]
 [Ignore("Ignore this test it is broken")]
 public void IsValidProductPrice()
 {

 p.ProductPrice = 100;
 if (p.ProductPrice > 0)
 {
 result = true;
 }

Assert.IsTrue(result, "Product Price is valid");

 }

On execution of test you will find that Test Runner has ignored this test. Test runner will skip test attributed with ignore.

clip_image002[6]

In this post we learnt how easily a test can be ignored in NUnit. I hope you find this post useful. Thanks for reading.

Test SetUp and TearDown in Unit Testing using NUnit : Part 2

Read Part 1 here: How to do Unit Test using NUnit : Part 1

In last post we talked about how to start with Unit Testing using NUnit. In this post I will discuss about following two topics,

  1. Test Setup
  2. Test Teardown

You need Test Setup and Test Teardown to remove any dependency between tests. Assume a scenario that

  • You want to create instance of a particular object before execution of any test
  • You want to delete a particular file from file system before execution of any test
  • You want to insert some test data or create some test data before execution of any test etc..

In above stated scenario you may want to create a Test Setup. Test Setup is a piece of code get executed before execution of any test.

clip_image002

Other use case could be that you want to perform a particular task after execution of each test. So once test got executed a certain task should get done and we call that Test Teardown. There could be scenario that

  • You want to destruct an instance after execution of any test
  • You want to remove test data after execution of any test
  • You want to delete a file from file system after execution of any test etc.

In above scenario you may want to create Test Teardown. Test Teardown is piece of code get executed after execution of any test.

clip_image002[6]

In NUnit you can create Test Setup and Test Teardown by using [Setup] and [TearDown] attribute on a function.

So Test Setup can be created as following,

image

And you can create Test Teardown as following

image

If there are 5 tests in your test class then these two functions will get executed 5 times. Now let us put our discussion into concrete example. Assume that you are writing Unit Test for a Product class. Product class is defined as following,

namespace MyAppToTest
{
 public class Product
 {
 double productPrice;

 public double ProductPrice
 {
 get
 {
 return productPrice;
 }

set
 {
 productPrice = value;
 }
 }
 }
}

A Unit Test is written to test valid product price as following,

[Test]
 public void IsValidProductPrice()
 {

 p.ProductPrice = 100;
 if (p.ProductPrice > 0)
 {
 result = true;
 }

Assert.IsTrue(result, "Product Price is valid");
 }

You can write Test SetUp and TearDown as following,


Product p;
 bool result;
 [SetUp]
 public void TestSetup()
 {
 p = new Product();
 result = false;

 }

[TearDown]
 public void TestTearDown()
 {
 p = null;
 result = false;
 }

The above two function will get executed each time before execution of test and after execution of test. In writing Unit Test , Test SetUp and Test TearDown are very handy and useful. I hope you find this post useful. Thanks for reading.